Why the ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ Trilogy Is an Ode to the Idea of Consent

Here lies Anastasia Steele, blindfolded and hog-tied. The innocent “Fifty Shades of Grey” heroine is just out of college and being whipped by a billionaire. Five months into the #MeToo movement, the franchise finale “Fifty Shades Freed” is hitting theaters — and despite our mental image of Dakota Johnson’s submissive Miss Steele, she might be a role model for the moment.

When the first film opened in 2015, it sparked a debate about pain, power, and BDSM. Was the sex sexy enough? Was Ana enjoying it? Or was Jamie Dornan’s Christian Grey, the grim tycoon who dove into his red-walled erotic aquarium looking as emotionless and cold-eyed as a shark?

In 2018, the conversation has changed. Today, the key point in the “Fifty Shades” flicks isn’t titillation — it’s consent. For all the eye-rolling that E.L. James’ hugely popular novels were a paean to old-fashioned romances where a girl married a man who took care of all of her needs, from new cell phones and laptops to a trip in his private plane, they’re strikingly modern in their insistence on hearing a woman say yes or no. Technically, Ana’s safe word is “red,” and when she uses it, Christian immediately uncuffs her ankles.

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply